From the deep end…

I remember the first time I played The Sims. It was years ago now, so long ago that I can’t remember if I was playing it first on my Apple LCIII or if I was playing it on my 8500. (Yes, I am definitely a computer geek.) I remember enjoying being able to tell someone what to do, and being responsible for whether or not they ate, slept, made music, art, watched TV and all of the above… but I was always conscious of the fact that I was controlling another person. If I look back and really think about it, I was most likely creating an alter-ego and doing the things I wanted to be doing in my life at the moment.

However, the lack of connection between the joy, sadness, happiness, etc felt by my electronic self and my real self kept me from really playing the game. I had a job in my simulated world, friends, a nice house, etc… and none of it translated into anything in the real world.

But now that’s beginning to change…

This article in business week, about Second Life is well worth checking out. People are now creating virtual versions of themselves and then making money from them. Talk about moonlighting, you could be a banker by day and a rock star by night.

Is this scary?

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YouTube and the competition…

YouTube is one of the great examples of what’s happening on the Web. On this site, you can upload video clips of just about anything and YouTube makes them easily viewable by anyone (anyone you want to see your video, you can make them private and only allow your friends/family to see them). The site is so popular that NBC has entered into a deal with them whereby content will be released on YouTube.

It’s fast becoming a platform for budding video producers, TV producers, recording artists and just about anyone else that wants to showcase their home movies to the world… and like everything else, is sparking lots of communication (by way of links being sent to one another and tagging and other Web 2.0 goodies).

Funny that I was recently telling someone I know that does TV presenting that they should start a TV show themselves and promote it via vodcast (video podcast, even though I hate the term vodcast) and YouTube… and how they could use this to get rich, and now there’s another company trying to do the same thing but offer a share of the profit to people whose videos are downloaded more often than others…. (see article on Cnet)

A great idea….

The only problem? They are called eefoof.com… a terrible name. If I’m lucky, I’ve blogged about this before igor has. They always have something to say about people with bad names.

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